Navigation – Plan du site

The Use of Rabbinic Traditions about Rome in the Babylonian Talmud

L’usage des traditions rabbiniques à propos de Rome dans le Talmud de Babylone
Ron Naiweld
p. 255-285

Résumés

Cet article avance l’idée que le Talmud de Babylone utilise des traditions anciennes sur Rome afin d’établir un « système-monde » dans lequel Rome et Israël entretiennent une relation conflictuelle, complémentaire et éternelle. L’analyse des sources talmudiques montre que les rabbins babyloniens héritèrent l’image complexe de Rome avec le reste des traditions rabbiniques au cours du iiie et du ive siècle de notre ère puis qu’ils retravaillèrent l’image palestinienne de Rome afin d’établir un parallélisme entre ce dernier et Israël. Ils soutinrent ainsi le pouvoir symbolique de l’empire romain, tout en vivant en dehors de celui-ci. Rome devint pour eux une image miroir d’Israël, qui, à son tour, devint un empire « spirituel », protégé par le roi des rois – Dieu.

Haut de page

Notes de l’auteur

This article is based on a paper presented at the conference “Judaism and the Political and Religious Challenge of the Roman Empire” (Aix en Provence, July 2012). I would like to thank the organizer of the conference, Katell Berthelot, and the other participants for their insightful remarks.

Accès au texte / extrait

Cairn

Texte intégral disponible via abonnement/accès payant sur le portail Cairn. Le texte intégral en libre accès sera disponible à cette adresse en janvier 2020.
Consulter cet article

Plan

Introduction. The Symbolic Existence of Rome and the Babylonian Talmud
Rome in Babylonia?
Status Quaestionis – The Representation of Rome in the Bavli
Eternal Rome and the Scholasticization of Rabbinic Discourse
Elevating Rome to the Stage of the Utmost Adversary
Equal Brothers
Conclusion

Aperçu du début du texte

Introduction. The Symbolic Existence of Rome and the Babylonian Talmud

There are many ways in which an Empire exists – as a political entity organizing various aspects of the life of its habitants; as an economic power, producing and distributing riches and controlling the division of labor; as a global actor, negotiating with foreign political entities, trying to conserve its interests while constantly redefining them. All of these “imperial forms of existence” are more or less easy to discern; they are traceable, since they produce objective evidence. This, however, is hardly true in the case of the form of existence that will be dealt with in this article. For, besides being or having an economic, political, and military power, an empire also constitutes a symbolic one; in other words, it exists in the minds of the people, whether they live inside it, or in countries and regions where its influence can be felt. The symbolic power of an empire is certainly supported by its economy ...

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence papier

Ron Naiweld, « The Use of Rabbinic Traditions about Rome in the Babylonian Talmud », Revue de l’histoire des religions, 2 | 2016, 255-285.

Référence électronique

Ron Naiweld, « The Use of Rabbinic Traditions about Rome in the Babylonian Talmud », Revue de l’histoire des religions [En ligne], 2 | 2016, mis en ligne le 01 juin 2019, consulté le 17 octobre 2017. URL : http://rhr.revues.org/8557 ; DOI : 10.4000/rhr.8557

Haut de page

Auteur

Ron Naiweld

Centre national de la recherche scientifique
ron.naiweld@ehess.fr

Articles du même auteur

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Tous droits réservés

Haut de page
  • Revues.org